The Hot List: Champagne icy poles, unicorn baked goods, food tattoos and a Dali cookbook

"Unicorn" is now a food trend.
"Unicorn" is now a food trend.  Photo: Vickee Yo

We're loving… UNICORN BAKED GOODS

First it was charcoal black. Then rainbow. Then "galaxy". Now it seems baked goods are taking on a more mystical bent with Insta-bakers turning to unicorns for inspiration. @Vickiee_Yo has added gold horns to dipped doughnuts, @rymondtn is creating cake pops modelled on the mystical creatures and the Instagram hashtag #unicorncakes has been used more than 11,300 times. We do believe in fairies.

Product photography by Mark Colliton London UK more info at www.markcolliton.com All Rights Reserved Filter cocoa at Xocolat? Pops grown-up booze icy poles? Salvador Dali cookbook? Breville smoking gun? Julia Rothman temporary food tattoos? Unicorn food trend?

We're buying… BOOZY POPSICLES

With summer just days away, alcoholic icy poles are about to hit Australia. From December 1, UK brand POPS is launching its premium popsicles here, including a gluten-free, 38-calorie champagne number that equates to half a glass of bubbles and has a blatant target market. There's also the bellini (half a glass of prosecco, peach schnapps, blood orange juice and hibiscus) and a couple of alcohol-free options. Suck responsibly. Stockists and orders at wearepops.com/au

Chicken parfait profiteroles at Bouche on Bridge

Chicken parfait profiteroles at Bouche on Bridge Photo: Supplied

We're eating… SAVOURY PROFITEROLES

Everyone's talking about the eschalot tarte tatin with parmesan ice-cream at Bouche on Bridge in Sydney CBD, but it's not the only savoury dish on the menu drawing inspiration from dessert. "Chicken parfait, mulberries, chicken skin" is a generous serve of delicate profiteroles with rich, weightless parfait where one might expect cream. Syrupy mulberry and shards of chicken skin taste somewhere between Christmas lunch and the local corner rotisserie, in a good way.

Filter cocoa at Xocolat

Filter cocoa at Xocolatl Photo: Supplied

We're drinking… FILTER COCOA

Now and then you come across something that makes you think, "Why hasn't anyone done this yet?" That anyone is Xocolatl, and the something is filter cocoa. The method is akin to filter coffee, with single origin cocoa nibs ground by mortar and pestle then added to a Hario V60 filter. The result is a delicate, tea-like beverage with an unmistakable chocolate aroma and lingering fullness from natural oils. Served with cocoa nibs, coverture chocolate and a tasting card, it's available at Xocolatl's Toorak store, Melbourne.

Breville's smoking gun

Breville's smoking gun Photo: Supplied

We're cooking with… A SMOKING GUN

Breville has released a hand-held smoker that's great for infusing flavour when you don't have the space or cash for a barbecue smoker. Home cooks can smoke everything from cheese and pulled pork to popcorn, cocktails and even Christmas pudding with woodchips, teas, dried herbs and spices. Load the gun, light it and then fire smoke into a covered food container. Swirl it around and then leave it to infuse for a few minutes. Batteries and flavoured wood chips included. brevillesmokinggun.com

Julia Rothman's temporary food tattoos

Julia Rothman's temporary food tattoos Photo: Supplied

We're obsessed with… TEMPORARY FOOD TATTOOS

Love food but not ready to commit to having it permanently inked onto your skin? Head to tattly.com and pick up a set of illustrated, temporary tattoos. Our favourite designs are by Julia Rothman and feature vegetables, popsicles and cupcakes. They're even printed with vegetable-based ink. Non-toxic and shipped from Brooklyn, New York, they also make great stocking stuffers. tattly.com

We're reading… A SALVADOR DALI COOKBOOK

Not only did Salvador Dali throw extravagant dinner parties, he also published a cookbook in 1973. Les Diners de Gala has been reprinted by Taschen and features more than 130 recipes, including aphrodisiacs, illustrated by Dali and separated into courses. Alongside recipes such as "Bush of crayfish in Viking herbs" are his eccentric reflections. "If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you," wrote Dali.