Momofuku chef David Chang says Aussie burgers are the world's worst

Daniel Wilson of Huxtaburger (above) says a perfect burger "is the sum of all of its parts".
Daniel Wilson of Huxtaburger (above) says a perfect burger "is the sum of all of its parts". Photo: Michael Clayton-Jones

A burger with 'the lot' is certainly not for the faint-hearted, nor is it for American chef, David Chang.

The internationally-acclaimed owner of the Momofuku series of restaurants has labelled Australia's burgers the world's worst in a piece in his food magazine, The Lucky Peach.

"You know who f---- up burgers more than anyone else in the world? Australians. Australia has no idea what a burger is. They put a fried egg on their burger. They put canned beetroot on it, like a wedge of it. I am not joking you. This is how they eat their burger," he writes in his burger manifesto.

Chang also gives wagyu burgers a spray, calling them the world's "dumbest".

As for what makes an ideal burger, Chang puts the following on his checklist: " ...bun, cheese, burger. Sometimes bacon. Ketchup on the side, so I can control it. Pickles—yes! Obviously. And the cheese thing has to be very clear: American cheese only." 

The Maryburger in Sydney's Newton escaped David Change's ire.
The Maryburger in Sydney's Newton escaped David Change's ire. Photo: Sahlan Hayes

Chefs across Australia have been left slightly sizzling at the claim; with Mary's in Newtown the only exception to his Aussie burger grilling.

Daniel Wilson from Melbourne's Huxtaburger includes 30 different burger variations in his new cookbook, from a deep-fried soft shell crab burger to a classic 'Reuben'. Huxtaburger's 'Bills'  burger includes an egg, pineapple and beetroot.

The quality of the ingredients are what matter, says Wilson.

Momofuku chef David Chang.
Momofuku chef David Chang. Photo: Marco Del Grande

"At the end of the day, if someone likes it and they are willing to pay, of course there is room for variety," he says.

Owner of Chur Burger in Sydney and Brisbane, Warren Turnbull, says the ideal burger is a matter of personal taste.

"Everyone has their own opinion in terms of the perfect burger and what should be on that burger," he says.

What? An Aussie-style burger "with the lot".
What? An Aussie-style burger "with the lot". Photo: Rebecca Hallas

"Who can really answer that question?"

Wilson, agrees.

"Some people are purists, and some people like variation. The same ideas and principles can be adapted to a lot of things" says Wilson.

Indeed, for Turnbull, "it's all about the patty."

And for Wilson? 

"I agree it needs to be a bun," he says. "Turkish bread? No thanks."

David Chang's tirade ends with a call for readers to "do as I say, not as I do" because  "hamburgers are pretty much all good."

As Aussies continue to join the hoards of crowds at their favourite burger eateries, this is one claim we can hold him to.

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