Beer, mustard and caraway hotdog buns

all details

With a rich, dark-brown crumb and a flavour reminiscent of light rye bread, these soft hotdog buns are perfect for footy franks.

Dan Lepard's beer, mustard and caraway hotdog buns.
Photo: William Meppem

Ingredients

150ml stout, such as Coopers

1 sachet dry yeast (7g)

75g rye or wholemeal plain flour

50g black treacle or molasses syrup

50g smooth mustard, yellow or dijon

2 eggs (60g each)

1 tbsp cocoa

2 tbsp caraway seeds

100g unsalted butter, softened

500g white bread flour

2 tsp salt

beaten egg and poppy seeds to finish

Method

1. Pour the stout into a mixing bowl and whisk in the yeast and rye flour. Cover and leave for two hours to bubble. If you want to make this ferment overnight, reduce the yeast to one teaspoon, cover well with plastic wrap and leave out on the worktop for 12 hours.

2. Beat in the black treacle, mustard, eggs, cocoa and caraway seeds until smooth. Rub the butter through the flour then add this with the salt to the yeast mixture. Mix everything together evenly to a soft dough, cover the bowl and leave for 10 minutes.

3. Lightly knead the dough for a bare 10 seconds (not minutes) on the worktop. Then return the dough to the bowl and leave for an hour to rise.

4. Divide the dough into eight equal pieces, about 130 grams each, shape each into a ball then cover and leave for 30 minutes. Line a tray with baking paper then pat each ball out slightly, roll up into a tight scroll then roll against the worktop with your hands to make a long sausage shape about 15 centimetres long and fat. Lay these touching one another on the tray, then cover loosely with plastic wrap to stop them drying and leave somewhere warm to rise. I heat the oven to 50C, switch it off and place the covered buns on the tray inside, checking on them after 15 minutes. Leave them to rise by almost double.

5. Heat the oven to 200C or 180C fan-forced. Brush with beaten egg, sprinkle with poppy seeds and bake for 25 minutes. Remove the tray from the oven, immediately cover it with a dry tea towel and leave to cool.

6. To serve, pull apart, cut down the top, place the hot footy frank inside and cover with fried onions and chopped jalapenos. To make it even more decadent you can melt grated edam on top.

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  • Cuisine - American (US)
  • Course - Lunch, Finger-food, Snacks
  • Occasion - Picnic, Barbecue

4 comments so far

  • I simply cannot understand how someone would eat any type of sausage, unless made themselves.
    Trotters, connective tissue, skin. I fail to understand why people eat minced products that they have no idea what the end product contains.

    Commenter
    DanB
    Location
    Melbourne
    Date and time
    July 04, 2014, 10:15AM
    • Mince in bolognese, nothing better.

      Commenter
      Catherine
      Location
      Date and time
      July 04, 2014, 1:03PM
  • I don't have a problem with eating that stuff. In Sydney, there were 3 different places that I bought sausages from, depending on what I felt like. Now I'm on the Gold Coast. The price of sausages is the same but I haven't been able to find any that are edible. The amount of salt and flavourings used is simply incredible.

    Commenter
    Party Stooge
    Location
    Date and time
    July 04, 2014, 6:06PM
  • What I don't understand why Australian chefs have to take foods that are essentially great because of their simplicity and when top produce is used (hot dogs, burgers, pizza) and then go and make it gourmet.

    It's almost as if they totally missed the point of the type of dish in first place.

    As another poster said, use premium home ground meat, home made bun, quality american mustard (yes, French's mustard is the one) and be done with it.

    Commenter
    steve
    Location
    sydney
    Date and time
    July 04, 2014, 9:46PM

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