Bolognese with kale and paleo parmesan

Pete Evans

all details

When the winter chill kicks in, nothing warms the soul like a hearty mince-based meal. Here's my take on bolognese sauce on a bed of sauteed kale with 'paleo' parmesan.

You can use grass-fed beef mince, or kangaroo or emu mince for this bolognese sauce.
You can use grass-fed beef mince, or kangaroo or emu mince for this bolognese sauce. Photo: Supplied

Ingredients

2 tbsp olive oil

1/2 brown onion, chopped

1/2 carrot, finely diced

1/2 celery stalk, finely diced

3 garlic cloves, minced

550g grass-fed beef mince or other red meat mince (venison, kangaroo, lamb or emu)

1 tsp freshly chopped oregano

200ml dry red wine

2 tbsp tomato paste

500g tomato passata

300ml chicken stock (gluten-free if required)

1 pinch chilli flakes (optional)

sea salt

freshly cracked black pepper

4 tbsp parsley, chopped

SAUTEED KALE

3 tbsp olive oil

3 cloves garlic, minced

2 bunches kale, stalks removed, leaves torn

6 tbsp chicken stock (gluten-free is required)

sea salt

freshly ground black pepper

PALEO PARMESAN

70g macadamia nuts (activated if possible), finely chopped

1 tbsp parsley, chopped finely

1 anchovy fillet in salt, rinsed, pat dried and finely chopped

1 tbsp melted ghee or extra virgin olive oil

1/2 lemon, finely zested

sea salt

freshly cracked black pepper

 

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 150C.

2. To make the paleo parmesan, combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix until well combined. Season with a pinch of sea salt. Spread the nut mixture onto a baking tray lined with baking paper and bake in the oven for five to eight minutes or until lightly golden. Allow to cool, then set aside.

3. To make the bolognese, heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium-to-high heat. Add the onions, carrots and celery, then cook for four to five minutes or until softened. Next, add the garlic and cook for a further one minute, or until fragrant and starting to brown. Add the mince and brown for five to six minutes, breaking up the meat with a wooden spoon into smaller pieces. Stir in the oregano and wine and cook until the wine is almost evaporated, about four to five minutes.

4. Add the tomato paste and cook for one minute. Add the passata, half the chicken stock, chilli flakes (if using) and season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper. Simmer on a low heat for 15 minutes and add the rest of the stock if needed. Toss the parsley through and keep the bolognese sauce warm.

5. To prepare the kale, heat a large frying pan over medium-to-high heat, add the oil and garlic to the pan and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the kale and chicken stock and cook for three minutes, tossing occasionally until wilted. Season with salt and pepper. You can do this in batches if your pan is not big enough to contain all the kale.

6. Divide the sauteed kale onto four serving plates and top with bolognese sauce, then sprinkle with paleo parmesan.

 

Correction: the original version of this recipe listed honey as an ingredient.  At the request of the author it has been removed.

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  • Main Ingredients - Beef, Nuts
  • Cuisine - Modern Australian
  • Course - Dinner, Main-course
  • Occasion - Family meals

18 comments so far

  • Paleo parmesan? Pete this time you've gone too far.

    That being said Bolognese is great served on broccoli instead of pasta. Yum yum.

    Commenter
    CBR
    Location
    Date and time
    June 25, 2014, 9:09AM
  • I read paleo, I shake my head and stop reading any further.

    Commenter
    David At the Bay
    Location
    Date and time
    June 25, 2014, 12:43PM
  • Help! I have a whole heap of macadamias but I can't find the activation switch.

    Commenter
    Captain Caveman
    Date and time
    June 25, 2014, 1:08PM
  • Didn't know chicken stock and passata were common ingredients in Paleolithic kitchens?

    I suspect the paleo label is rather short on science... and rigour?

    Commenter
    paleo-skeptic
    Location
    Date and time
    June 25, 2014, 1:30PM
  • David at the Bay - and yet you took the time to comment.
    Paleo-skeptic - really? crushed tomatoes and chicken carcasses boiled in water? Not exactly 21st century ingredients.
    Why all the negativity people?

    Commenter
    Really?
    Location
    Date and time
    June 25, 2014, 2:11PM
    • @really

      Not being "negative" just asking for a little historical and editorial rigour... as we're talking stone age (no metals at all), most "modern" cooking techniques such as boiling things in pots cannot possibly be considered paleo - in even the broadest terms. Oh, no farmed or imported ingredients either.

      If anything's "negative" [in soul terms] it's pretending this empty hipster nonsense contains any substance at all (intellectual or poetic or even whimsy).

      Commenter
      paleo-skeptic
      Location
      Date and time
      June 25, 2014, 2:42PM
    • I'm not sure that Paleo-skeptic explicitly or even implicitly said that crushed tomatoes and chicken carcasses boiled in water are 21st century ingredients... He is correct, though. This paleo fad is total nonsense, but there are some who take it seriously and don't try to cheat with with recipes like the above. Good luck to them, I guess.

      Commenter
      Bertie
      Location
      Date and time
      June 25, 2014, 3:22PM
    • Paleo-Skeptik, you're being way too literal. It's just a name, what matters is whether or not the principles work for you or not. Most of it works for me regardless of whether I cook in a freekin metal pot or not.

      Commenter
      Mark
      Location
      Date and time
      June 25, 2014, 4:06PM
    • Yes, I like to let pretentious people know when they are misleading people. I am capable of both skipping rubbish and commenting that I saw rubbish.

      Commenter
      David At the Bay
      Location
      Date and time
      June 26, 2014, 1:43PM
  • I'm with you Really? Why all the negativity.

    Whether its called paleo or not doesn't matter, the dish sounds tasty and for those that don't want to eat pasta or dairy it's a great alternative. I haven't had spag bol since I gave up wheat 2 years ago and this looks like a great alternative.

    Keep up the great work Pete Evans.

    Commenter
    Mark
    Location
    Date and time
    June 25, 2014, 2:40PM

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