Indian-spiced cauliflower rice

Jill Dupleix
Light and steamy: Devotees of cauliflower rice say it's heaven for those who can't eat grains.
Light and steamy: Devotees of cauliflower rice say it's heaven for those who can't eat grains. Photo: Jessica Hromas
Difficulty
Easy

The darling of the paleo, low-carb, vegan, gluten-free set, cauliflower "rice" is raw cauliflower whizzed in a food processor until reduced to a rubble, then gently pan-fried, steamed, blanched in stock or water, or eaten raw. And it's amazing! It tastes of cauliflower but it's so light and steamy, it's like eating couscous or rice. Devotees - and there are many - say it's heaven for those who can't or don't eat grains, rice or potatoes. I say it's heaven, regardless.

Ingredients

800g cauliflower

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 tsp brown mustard seeds

1 mild green chilli, sliced

2 cinnamon sticks

1 tbsp favourite curry powder

1 tsp turmeric powder

125ml hot vegetable stock or water

1/2 tsp sea salt

1/2 tsp sugar

2 green (spring) onions, chopped

2 tbsp flaked almonds or cashews, toasted

Method

1. Cut the thickest stems off the cauliflower and save them for soup. Chop or slice the cauliflower florets and pulse in a food processor until they look like rice or couscous. Don't overdo it or you will end up with mush.

2. Heat the oil in a fry pan, add the mustard seeds, green chilli and cinnamon sticks and cook for 30 seconds.

3. Add the cauliflower, tossing well to coat and let it pan-roast for one minute. Add the curry powder, turmeric, stock or water, sea salt and sugar and cook, tossing occasionally, for three minutes or until the water has evaporated and the cauliflower is tender.

4. Add spring onions, toss well, scatter with almonds or cashews and serve.

Tip: The blitzed cauliflower can get a bit whiffy if you store it before cooking.

Los Angeles chef Ben Ford - who just happens to be actor Harrison Ford's son - says he was working on a lamb dish with chef Govind Armstrong at his restaurant Chadwick in 1998, when he came up with the concept of ''ricing'' cauliflower.

 

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