Forget blue, golden or rainbow, the next latte trend is here (and it's colour-free)

The coffee colour spectrum.
The coffee colour spectrum. Photo: Supplied

We're loving … COFFEE COLOUR WARS

Lattes have gone from rainbow to matcha-green to turmeric-gold to algae-blue. But once you have covered the spectrum there is only one place to go: back to black. That's what White Mojo, with cafes in Balwyn and Melbourne's CBD, has done with its oh-so-Melbourne black latte. It's healthy (of course), and gets its tone from stone-ground black sesame seeds blended with peanuts, almonds and soy milk. Taste-wise, it's kind of like warm, melted sesame ice-cream.

We're buying … WASABI POWDER

Most of us have never had fresh wasabi in our homes. It's tricky to grow and find, but way ahead of that rubbish in the tube. Shima Wasabi in Tasmania, recently acquired by TasFoods, has it down to a fine art. It supplies more than 100 of our best restaurants, including Tetsuya's in Sydney, but recommends its pure wasabi powder for home. It's hand-picked and snap-frozen to lock in aroma. No horseradish, colours, flavours or preservatives, $29.95 or $59.95. See shimawasabi.com.au

We're freezing … BREAKFAST POPSICLES

They say breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but what "they" haven't told you is that it can be as fun as it is convenient. Instead of cereal and granola, try making breakfast popsicles. Mix and layer your favourite ingredients in some icy pole moulds and freeze overnight. Tip: soak sugary cereal in milk before freezing, or check out this healthy recipe by Erin Clarke of Well Plated: wellplated.com/yogurt-popsicles.

Australian Spirits Guide and cocktails? Black latte? Carbonated coffee carbondated coffee Food stools?? Hendricks cucumber seeds? Zero Gradi nutella on tap?

Want your coffee with extra sugar, soy milk or fizz? There's a new way to get your cobuzz. Photo: Supplied

We're drinking… CARBONATED COFFEE

Coffee Alchemy in Marrickville, Sydney, has served chilled, carbonated coffee since 2008. More recently the team behind Maker Coffee in Richmond, Melbourne, launched North Street Carbonated Coffee on tap, spiked with natural botanicals and unrefined sweetener. But a new trend is on the rise: keep an eye out for cafes, such as Melbourne's Market Lane and BAWA, topping espresso with tonic and a hint of citrus.

Australian Spirits Guide and cocktails? Black latte? Carbonated coffee carbondated coffee Food stools?? Hendricks cucumber seeds? Zero Gradi nutella on tap?

 

The perfect seats for snacking. Photo: Supplied

We're obsessed with … GIANT FOOD STOOLS

Nothing says, "I'm serious about food" like a stool shaped like one of Instagram's favourite dishes. Why sit on a chair or exercise ball when you could perch on a burger, doughnut stack, half-eaten  corn cob or even a watermelon? Available in store or online from thirddrawerdown.com

We're reading … The Australian Spirits Guide

With Australian-made spirits gaining recognition worldwide, it was only a matter of time before someone compiled them into a beautiful book. The Australian Spirits Guide, by writer and bartender Luke McCarthy, is a stylish celebration of the distiller's art Down Under. Discover the history and stories of 60 of our best spirits, alongside price guides, tasting notes and cocktail recipes from the nation's best bartenders. 

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You don't even need a jar to  get your Nutella fix anymore.

You don't even need a jar to get your Nutella fix anymore. Photo: Supplied

We're eating … NUTELLA ON TAP

If we could stick our heads under the Nutella taps sprouting up in Melbourne's best gelati stores, this might fit better into the 'We're drinking' category. First a hit at Pidapipo stores and now at Zero Gradi in Brunswick East (they go through 15 kilograms a week), the hazelnut gold flows thick and warm onto your favourite flavours. For a Nutella fix in Sydney, go to Tella Balls Dessert Bar in Dulwich Hill.

We can't believe … HENDRICK'S HOMAGE TO 'STRAYA

After what may be the strangest social media campaign to date, Hendrick's, a "most unusual gin", asked the public to vote on the best ingredients to grow an Australian cucumber. The people have spoken, and now a team from Sydney University will grow cukes in a greenhouse in Cobbitty, NSW, using soil from the Simpson Desert, emu poo and yabby shells – to the tune of Waltzing Matilda. They will be harvested and distributed in early to mid-November as the ultimate Aussie gin garnish.