Four summer spins on the humble crumble

Do your civic duty and make this strawberry raspberry balsamic crumble.
Do your civic duty and make this strawberry raspberry balsamic crumble. Photo: Katrina Meynink

Crumble is the kind of dessert that should be made at home. No offence to chefs, but there is something about restaurant kitchens that manage to, without fail, roger a rustic-style pudding. With that in mind, I've tried hard not to be 'that guy' and fancy-up the greatest, simplest of dishes – the humble crumble. I've just put a summery spin to it, so you can make it no matter the weather. Because stewed fruit with a few crunchy delights should be enjoyed year-round.

Strawberry raspberry balsamic crumble with sweetened labna

Strawberry and balsamic belong together and given the strawberry sabotage situation earlier this year, making this dessert is basically our national obligation. This has quite a soupy base, so be sure to strain the raspberries if using frozen. The berry-sweetened balsamic goodness is also wonderful scooped over vanilla ice-cream.

INGREDIENTS

Crumble

150g butter, softened

1 cup plain flour

¼ cup raw castor sugar

¼ cup rolled oats

Filling

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⅓ cup maple syrup

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

1 tsp vanilla extract

1kg strawberries, hulled and quartered

250g raspberries

To serve

150g labna

½ tbsp honey

freeze-dried raspberries or strawberries

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 160C.

Combine the crumble mixture in a bowl until coarse crumbs form. Set aside.

In a separate bowl, combine the labna and honey and set aside.

In another bowl, add the filling ingredients and toss to coat. Set aside for 10 minutes before transferring the fruit mix into a 30cm diameter round baking dish. Scatter with the crumble topping and bake for 30 minutes or until the topping has browned and the fruit has softened.

Top with spoonfuls of the sweetened labna, scatter with freeze-dried berries and serve.

Pineapple and kaffir lime crumble recipe. Spring and summer crumble recipes for Good Food October 2018. Please credit Katrina Meynink.

Serve this tropical crumble with quick kaffir lime dust and coconut gelato. Photo: Katrina Meynink

Pineapple and kaffir lime crumble

This crumble belongs on your table on hot days. Despite being a warm dessert, the pineapple, coconut and kaffir keep this fresh and light.

INGREDIENTS

6 kaffir lime leaves for dust

Crumble

100g butter

½ cup plain flour

¼ cup brown sugar

3 tsp ground ginger

Filling

½ tbsp coconut oil

½ cup brown sugar

1.2kg pineapple, peeled, cored and cut into batons (about 2cm x 5cm)

2 kaffir lime leaves, deveined and finely sliced

To serve

Coconut gelato

METHOD

Preheat oven to 175C.

For the kaffir lime dust put the leaves on the microwave plate and microwave on high for 2 minutes. Carefully remove the leaves and allow to cool and crisp. Devein the leaves and pound to a powder in a mortar and pestle. If you'd prefer not to have any larger crunchy pieces, sieve the powder into a bowl and set aside.

For the crumble topping combine the ingredients in a bowl and rub in the butter with your fingertips until chunky crumbs form.

Combine the filling ingredients in a bowl and pour into a 30cm diameter round baking dish. Don't worry if you have to pile the pineapple, it cooks down as it bakes. Scatter over the crumble topping then place in the oven and bake for 40-50 minutes. You want the pineapple to soften and caramelise but not be pulpy – it should hold its shape. If the crumble topping is taking on too much colour, cover with foil and then remove for the last few minutes of cooking.

Serve with a scoop of coconut gelato sprinkled with kaffir lime dust.

Serves 4

Gin and tonic crumble with elderflower lemon curd recipe. Spring and summer crumble recipes for Good Food October 2018. Please credit Katrina Meynink.

Apple crumble meets G&T. Photo: Katrina Meynink

Gin and tonic crumble with elderflower lemon curd

Use a botanical, floral gin to keep this crumble on-theme. Any leftover curd will keep in a sterilised jar for 2 weeks. If you can't find elderflower extract you can try elderflower cordial, but the added sugar will impact the sweetness – add the cordial slowly and taste to ensure it doesn't override the tang of the lemon.

INGREDIENTS

Filling

⅓ cup gin

¼ cup tonic water

6 apples, peeled, cored and sliced 1cm thick (I used granny smiths)

¼ cup brown sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

Lemon curd

juice and zest of 2 lemons

165g castor sugar

80g butter

2 eggs plus 2 egg yolks

½ tsp elderflower extract (or to taste)

Crumble

150g plain flour

65g brown sugar

75g butter, coarsely chopped

elderflower flowers and vanilla ice-cream, to serve (optional)

METHOD

Preheat oven to 160C.

For the curd, add the butter, sugar, elderflower extract and lemon juice and zest to a saucepan and place over low heat. Whisk continuously until the butter has melted and ingredients are fully incorporated. In a separate bowl, whisk the whole eggs and yolks then add to the lemon mixture and whisk constantly until the curd thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon (about 10 minutes). Strain through a sieve and place in the fridge until ready to serve.

Add the filling ingredients into a high-sided baking dish (about 1.5-litre capacity) and gently stir to combine. Place in the oven and cook for 15 minutes until some of the liquid evaporates.

Meanwhile, make the crumble. Add the flour, sugar and butter to a bowl, and using your fingertips, rub the butter into the dry ingredients until the mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs.

Carefully remove the dish from the oven, scatter the crumble mixture over the apples and return to the oven for another 15 to 20 minutes or until the topping is golden and crisp.

To serve, scoop the crumble into bowls, dollop a few tablespoons of lemon curd onto each, and scatter with fresh elderflowers, if using.

Serves 6

Pear, bay leaf and toasted fennel crumble with white chocolate recipe. Spring and summer crumble recipes for Good Food October 2018. Please credit Katrina Meynink.

Pear crumble with pools of melted white chocolate. Photo: Katrina Meynink

Pear, bay leaf and toasted fennel crumble with white chocolate

If your crumble takes on too much colour, cover tightly with foil and remove for the last five minutes of baking.

INGREDIENTS

Filling

1 tbsp fennel seeds

5 pears (about 1kg) peeled, cored and roughly chopped

scant ¼ cup brown sugar

¼ cup water

2 fresh bay leaves

Topping

100g butter

½ cup plain flour

½ cup rolled oats

½ cup desiccated coconut

½ cup pistachio kernels, roughly chopped

½ tsp ground fennel seeds

¼ cup castor sugar

To serve

125g white chocolate, broken into chunks

dried rose petals (optional)

vanilla ice-cream (optional)

METHOD

Preheat oven to 160C.

Toast fennel seeds in a small non-stick frying pan over medium heat, shaking often, until fragrant (about 1 to 2 minutes). Cool, then finely grind using a mortar and pestle. Return the ground fennel to the pan and add the remaining filling ingredients. Cook over low-medium heat for 20 minutes, stirring regularly. Remove the bay leaves.

For the crumble, add the topping ingredients to a bowl and use your hands to combine until the mixture becomes coarse chunks.

Pour the pears into a 25cm diameter round baking dish and scatter over the topping mixture. Bake in the oven for 30 minutes or until pears are bubbling and the crumble topping has browned. Remove and gently push the white chocolate chunks into the pear mixture. Wait until the residual heat melts the chocolate, then scatter with dried rose petals, if using, and serve.

Serves 4