Adam Liaw's pizza con tomate

Adam Liaw
Pizza con tomate.
Pizza con tomate. Photo: William Meppem

Make this simple all-in pizza dough up to three days in advance. This adds a basic tomato and anchovy topping, but you can use whatever you like.

Ingredients

4 ripe tomatoes

3 cloves garlic, 2 of them thinly sliced and one halved

1 cup good-quality extra virgin olive oil

salt, to season

1 tin anchovies

All-in pizza dough (enough for 4 pizzas)

1kg strong bread flour or "tipo 00" flour

650ml water

20g salt

1 packet dry yeast

3 tbsp olive oil

Method

1. For the dough, combine ingredients in a stand mixer with the dough attachment. Knead until a smooth dough forms. Divide it into 4 equal pieces and transfer to individual plastic containers of 2 cups' capacity with airtight lids. Place in fridge for 3 days to proof slowly. If you prefer not to cold-proof the dough, you can allow it to proof at room temperature for about 1 hour. 

2. Cut tomatoes in half and grate the cut side on a box grater, discarding the skin. 

3. Remove the dough from the fridge about 30 minutes before dinner. Using your fingers, press one piece of dough out on a piece of baking paper to about the same size as a heavy frying pan that can fit in the oven (a 26cm frying pan is a good size). Push from the centre out to create a thick crust on the pizza. Rub a cut garlic clove over the dough and place a few garlic slices on top. Spread a little grated tomato (you'll add more later) over the centre of the pizza dough, avoiding the crust. Drizzle everything with about 2 tablespoons of olive oil and season generously with salt. Repeat for the remaining pieces of dough.

4. Heat your oven's overhead grill as high as it can go. Heat the frying pan over high heat on your stove top until very hot. Pick up the paper and drop it together with the pizza onto the frying pan and transfer to the oven. Cook for about 4 minutes, until the pizza is cooked through and risen. Remove from the oven, spread more tomato on top, add a few anchovies, drizzle with more olive oil, then serve.

Adam's tip Cold-proofing takes time but no additional effort and the slow development of yeast produces a better flavour. It's important to portion the dough before proofing so your pizza will trap more carbon dioxide for a lighter result.

Also try Adam Liaw's pizza doughnuts

This recipe will appear in Sunday Life magazine on Sunday, February 13.